Expert Opinion

"At the moment, those undergoing the treatment are between 16 and 53. On average, after only 10 sessions, not only is there great improvement in vision but it is also maintained for at least two years."
Prof Donald Tan, Director Singapore Eye Research Institute and Deputy Director, Singapore National Eye Centre
"This treatment helps the brain to better understand the images the eyes are sending it, rather than altering the images the eyes receive by using corrective lenses or surgically altering the eye itself."
Dr Chan Wing Kwong, Senior Consultant and Head of Refractive Surgery Centre, Singapore National Eye Centre
"For example, select an item in your house that you cannot see clearly. After that, every five sessions, take a look at the object again and you will notice that your vision has become sharper. These are testimonials from patients who have experienced this."
Prof Donald Tan, Director Singapore Eye Research Institute and Deputy Director, Singapore National Eye Centre
"Vision is dependent on two things, how your eye receives the image and how your brain interprets the image. NeuroVision helps the brain to interpret sharper images."
Dr Chan Wing Kwong, Senior Consultant and Head of Refractive Surgery Centre, Singapore National Eye Centre
"Naturally we were quite skeptical about the whole thing, because traditionally, ophthalmologists thought that apart from glasses and surgery, other methods wouldn't work for myopia. But we tried it out, and it did work."
Dr Chan Wing Kwong, Senior Consultant and Head of Refractive Surgery Centre, Singapore National Eye Centre
What Is Amblyopia

Amblyopia or 'Lazy Eye' is a disorder of the visual system characterised by poor or indistinct vision in an otherwise physically normal eye. It only develops during childhood, but if untreated, generally persists throughout adult life.


In the 1950s and 1960s, Professors Hubert and Wiesel carried out experiments in which one eye of new born kittens were sewn shut for 3 months. When these eyes were finally opened, it was found that the kittens could not see out of them. When the brains of these kittens were examined, areas of the brain responsible for vision had only developed normal connections with the open eye. These experiments formed the basis of our understanding of lazy eye.


In a child, the brain ignores images from a wandering or unfocused eye. This situation is similar to the kittens, where one eye was shut from an early age. The problem in a child may be caused by a squint, unrecognised long sightedness or astigmatism, or abnormalities blocking normal vision such as cataracts. This results in the failure of development of normal nerve connections between the affected eye and the brain's visual system. Poor vision occurs even when the refractive error is fully corrected later with spectacles or contact lenses.


The problem cannot be corrected with glasses, surgery or other optical measures, since the problem is related to the visual part of the brain (visual cortex) and not to the eye.


Lazy eye, or amblyopia, does not develop in people after the age of about 10-11, as development of the nervous system is mostly complete by this stage. As such, even if cataracts block the vision of an adult for many months or years, vision will still return to normal after corrective surgery as the eye does not become lazy during the period of cataract related visual impairment.