Expert Opinion

"At the moment, those undergoing the treatment are between 16 and 53. On average, after only 10 sessions, not only is there great improvement in vision but it is also maintained for at least two years."
Prof Donald Tan, Director Singapore Eye Research Institute and Deputy Director, Singapore National Eye Centre
"This treatment helps the brain to better understand the images the eyes are sending it, rather than altering the images the eyes receive by using corrective lenses or surgically altering the eye itself."
Dr Chan Wing Kwong, Senior Consultant and Head of Refractive Surgery Centre, Singapore National Eye Centre
"For example, select an item in your house that you cannot see clearly. After that, every five sessions, take a look at the object again and you will notice that your vision has become sharper. These are testimonials from patients who have experienced this."
Prof Donald Tan, Director Singapore Eye Research Institute and Deputy Director, Singapore National Eye Centre
"Vision is dependent on two things, how your eye receives the image and how your brain interprets the image. NeuroVision helps the brain to interpret sharper images."
Dr Chan Wing Kwong, Senior Consultant and Head of Refractive Surgery Centre, Singapore National Eye Centre
"Naturally we were quite skeptical about the whole thing, because traditionally, ophthalmologists thought that apart from glasses and surgery, other methods wouldn't work for myopia. But we tried it out, and it did work."
Dr Chan Wing Kwong, Senior Consultant and Head of Refractive Surgery Centre, Singapore National Eye Centre
Contrast Sensitivity and Sports Vision

When competing in sport, most of the information you need to make fast, effective visual judgment decisions comes through your eyes (the ability to focus on and follow objects, to gauge distances and distinguish edges, to coordinate the hands with the eyes, to clearly discriminate between objects and their backgrounds).

Whilst established training methods have been shown to help improve most of these abilities, the ability to discriminate objects from their backgrounds (contrast sensitivity function - CSF) has long been considered beyond improvement.

Contrast Sensitivity measures the visual system's ability to process or filter spatial and temporal information about objects and their backgrounds under varying light conditions. In theory, CSF is decreased as a moving object's velocity is increased. The higher the athlete's CSF profile, the more likely the athlete can discriminate the object as its velocity increases. Increased contrast sensitivity is useful in many sports, and studies have shown that the best sportsmen and sportswomen have excellent contrast sensitivity*.


*Hoffman LG, Polan G, Powell J. The relationship of contrast sensitivity functions to sports vision.
J Am Optom Assoc 1984 Oct; 55(10):747-52.

For example in baseball:

"Increased contrast sensitivity is useful at all player positions, from that of the outfielder, who must follow a batted ball against the changing background of the spectators in the stands and the blue (or dark) sky, to that of the pitcher, who must detect the precise placement of the catcher's glove against the catcher's and the umpire's uniforms. Our data are in agreement with those of Hoffman*, Polan and Powell, who found that collegiate varsity baseball players had greater contrast sensitivity than the controls did."

"The Visual Function of Professional Baseball Players" Daniel M. Laby et al.
American Journal of Ophthalmology 1996; 122; 476-485

Contrast sensitivity is crucial for skiers, who must see shadows in the snow in front of them so they know when to turn and change direction.

Contrast sensitivity is also crucial for golfers. They must be able to see the undulations of the golf course. The ability to pick out the subtle contours of the greens and to see the line of the putt in dull or hazy conditions.

Contrast sensitivity is especially crucial for shooters, who must have the ability to pick out the target clay pigeon flying through the air in dull or hazy conditions. (For example, aiming at orange clays against a moderately-bright background).

A better contrast sensitivity will likely improve performance in your favourite sports.